NETWORK COLLECTIVE

OFF THE CUFF – INTEROP SPEAKERS PANEL - 2 MAY 2018

At Interop ITX 2018, Network Collective sat down with a few of our favorite speakers from the Network Transformation Summit to chat about the topics they were presenting on. From the emergence and importance of disaggregations and whitebox switching (Peyton Maynard-Koran), multi-gig connectivity for getting more out of your cabling investments (Peter Jones), to business driven design (Denise Donohue), this episode has a little bit of everything.

INTEROP ITX 2018

Keynote - 2 MAY 2018

Interop ITX 2018 Keynote Peyton Maynard-Koran, Senior Director, Worldwide Infrastructure of Whole Foods/Amazon, shares his view on the State of Enterprise IT and gives us a glimpse into where it’s heading.

Network Transformation Summit Day 2 - 1 MAY 2018

As enterprises build out their digital transformation strategies, IT infrastructure is rapidly evolving to keep up. Businesses are focusing on modernizing their networks to support skyrocketing connectivity demands while improving agility and service levels. This ushers in a new breed of software-defined, service-based, and open source network infrastructure that allows flexibility, automation, and integration with cloud models and applications.

This two-day program, hosted by IDC senior analyst Brandon Butler, will explore how today's enterprise networks must adapt to meet the needs of today's technology-centric businesses and will explore how those who build these networks need to prepare for challenges on the horizon.

INFORMATIONWEEK

Whole Foods and Its Amazonian Approach - 18 apr, 2019

In the wake of Amazon's acquisition of Whole Foods, Peyton Maynard-Koran has brought a new approach to IT infrastructure in the grocery chain.

PACKET PUSHERS

Datanauts 118: The Whitebox & Enterprise Networks -24 JaN, 2018

Using open source software on a variety of hardware platforms is old news on the compute side of the IT house. Now, whitebox hardware and open source software are challenging incumbent network vendors and demonstrating new operational models for network engineers.

Web-scale giants have blazed the trail for whitebox/open source networking, and the tools and technologies these giants use are finding their way into the enterprise.

What does all of this mean for enterprise infrastructure going forward? We ponder these questions on the Datanauts podcast.

Our guest is Peyton Maynard-Koran, currently working at a stealthy blockchain startup.

We talk with Peyton about the problems that exist with big networking vendors (feature bloat, tightly coupled software and hardware, and other issues), and how these problems create challenges for network operators.

We also explore how disaggregation, open source, and an emphasis on software offer a different vision for how to build, buy, and operate networks.

 

Show 365: You Can’t Do That In Enterprise Networks - NOV 10, 2017

“You can’t do that in an Enterprise.”

“The Enterprise doesn’t work that way.”

“What about legacy infrastructure and applications?”

These are common excuses that are made for why the enterprise can’t do new things in networking.

Many organizations are reluctant to embrace open source, white box, and other technologies that could transform how networks are built and operated.

Our guest today is Peyton Maynard-Koran, VP at UpChannel. An industry veteran who has worked with equipment from practically every major vendor—including Cisco, Juniper, and Arista Networks—Maynard-Koran and the Packet Pushers talk about why some enterprise networks avoid change, and why vendors want to keep it that way.

GARTNER

Look Beyond Network Vendors for Network Innovation - Jan 23, 2018

Summary: To support digital business, infrastructure and operations leaders responsible for networking must transform their data center networks from fragile to agile. This demands innovation, which is being driven by large network operators, such as cloud providers, rather than established network vendors.

FUTURE:NET

LAS VEGAS, NV - AUG 30, 2017

 

RIOT DIRECT

RIOT GAMES 2014 - 2016

 

FIXING THE INTERNET FOR REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS: PART III

Over my last two posts, I’ve talked about the challenges facing real-time applications like League that arise from the internet’s architecture, and how Riot is tackling some of those challenges by creating our own network. In this post, I’d like to look forward - what’s next, and how can we collectively get there? This topic has inspired a lot of reflection on my own experience building networks, and has galvanized my perspective that things are changing for the better. At its core, this post deals with how we can enact meaningful and positive change to the internet itself.

 

FIXING THE INTERNET FOR REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS: PART II

In my last post I talked about how the internet is far from ideal for real-time applications like League of Legends and how the resulting latency and packet loss make for frustrating real-time game experiences. The next logical question is, “OK, Peyton, what do we do about it?”

 

FIXING THE INTERNET FOR REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS: PART I

League of Legends is not a game of seconds, but of milliseconds. In day-to-day life, two seconds fly by unnoticed—you took two seconds reading that! In-game, however, a two-second stun can feel like an absolute eternity. In any single match of LoL, thousands of decisions made in milliseconds dictate which team scores bragging rights and which settles for “honorable opponent” points.

 

ALCATEL-LUCENT (NOW NOKIA)

CTO CABLE OFFICE 2008 - 2014

EDGE TRANSFORMATION OF THE CABLE HUB

 

TRANSFORMING THE CABLE HUB